Windows 10: The good, the bad and the ugly.

 In Microsoft

As 2015 comes to an end I feel like it’s an appropriate time to review Windows 10. Microsoft released this version of it’s popular operating system on July 29th earlier this year. Since that time I’ve put in a lot of hours working within the software. In this blog post I want to take the time to tell you what I’ve seen.

The Initial Upgrade Process

There was a lot of hype around Windows 10. A lot of our clients were disappointed with Windows 8/8.1. Windows 10 was a free upgrade from Windows 8/8.1 and it promised to deliver a more familiar computing experience. For this reason we found that many people chose to move to the new operating system. Microsoft made the upgrade process appear simple and in many situations it was. This wasn’t always the case however.

When any new operating system comes out I always take the time to perform thorough testing. I wouldn’t recommend anything to my clients that I personally haven’t investigated first. I started by upgrading many of the non-essential computers in my office. Out of the 10 computers that my technicians and I decided to upgrade there were six that didn’t give us any problems. The other four did present us with a fair amount of issues which included freezing, driver issues and software issues. We ended up reverting these computers back to their previous operating systems.

Of course there were individuals that didn’t consult us when upgrading to the new operating system. We saw an increased amount of customers dropping off their equipment with various issues relating to their attempt to update their computer to Windows 10. While no one experienced data loss we did have to wipe a decent number of systems to get them back up and running.

Navigating Windows 10

I quickly found that it was very easy and intuitive to navigate through Windows 10. My clients that upgraded from Windows 8/8.1 praised the new operating system for it’s return to a more Windows 7 feel. When Windows 8 was released we had many people call in and ask for help navigating the operating system. We received a lot fewer of those types of calls with Windows 10.

I’m glad that Microsoft decided to create the “tablet mode” feature which can be invoked if the user chooses. So now you aren’t automatically taken to the Windows 8 Metro Tile screen when you start the operating system. This screen can be useful though when operating on a tablet so I’m happy that they didn’t do away with it completely.

Security

Windows 10 has a lot of people concerned when it comes to security. From their data sharing policies to the Wi-Fi sharing features. As I did some research on the subjects I was concerned as well. Here are some articles from wired.com and pcworld.com that you may want to check out. I highly suggest reading them.

Wired – Windows 10 Security Settings You Need to Know

PC World – Wi-Fi Password Sharing

Automatic Updates

The biggest issue I have with Windows 10 at this time is the fact that Microsoft forces you to download and install updates. This has created a host of problems with third party hardware vendors. I’ve experienced issues first hand with sound cards, graphic cards and other hard drive components. In the past Microsoft has allowed you to choose when, what and if you want to install updates. I feel like this change in policy is a mistake and the link below from howtogeek.com can provide you with some information on how you can get around this feature.

howtogeek – How to Prevent Windows From Automatically Downloading Updates

Final Thoughts

I honestly feel like Windows 10 is a step in the right direction. Like so many of Microsoft’s operating systems in the past though I feel like it needs a bit more time. After some patching, changes in policy and bug fixes I believe Windows 10 will be a solid operating system. Until that time I’d stick with Windows 7 or 8 unless you absolutely hate navigating through Windows 8.

 

Thanks for reading!



Zach Tomlin is the owner of Tomlin Technology. Tomlin Technology is an IT Support company located in Westminster, Maryland. Windows 10: The good, the bad and the ugly

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